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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Seals of Arctic and Eastern Canada.(Rev.1967). found in the catalog.

Seals of Arctic and Eastern Canada.(Rev.1967).

Fisheries Research Board of Canada.

Seals of Arctic and Eastern Canada.(Rev.1967).

by Fisheries Research Board of Canada.

  • 164 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


Edition Notes

1

SeriesFisheries Research Board of Canada Bulletin -- 137(Rev.67)
ContributionsMansfield, A.W.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21914612M

CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): The harbor seal is found in all nearshore waters of the Atlantic Ocean and adjoining seas above about 30 degrees latitude (Katona et al. ). In the western North Atlantic, they are distributed from the eastern Canadian Arctic and Greenland south to southern New England and New York, and occasionally to the.   Some harp seal pups were marked with four types of tags over 5 years from commercial sealing ships at the breeding patches off eastern Canada. Recovery rates from individual taggings ranged up to 20%. The greatest age at recovery was 4 years, 10 months.

  For the retrospective analysis of NAO conditions and sea ice, we considered patterns in sea ice cover in two breeding regions of harp seals – the Gulf of St. Lawrence in eastern Canada, and the White Sea region between Norway and Russia – in . ACCURACY OF AGE DETERMINATION IN THE GREY SEAL HALICHOERUS GRYPUS OF EASTERN CANADA A. W. Mansfield. Arctic Biological Station, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, St. Pierre Boulevard, Ste‐Anne‐de‐Bellevue, Quebec H9X 3R4. Search for more papers by this author.

  Adult seals almost exclusively feed on Arctic cod (92% of total prey), whereas the juveniles/pups mainly feed on amphipods (76% of total prey) (Matley et al., ). In the high Arctic sites, the diet of seals and kittiwakes are similar (e.g., mainly Arctic cod), .   Harp seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus) have evolved life history strategies to exploit seasonal sea ice as a breeding platform. As such, individuals are prepared to deal with fluctuations in the quantity and quality of ice in their breeding areas. It remains unclear, however, how shifts in climate may affect seal populations. The present study assesses the effects of climate change on harp.


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Seals of Arctic and Eastern Canada.(Rev.1967) by Fisheries Research Board of Canada. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Seals of Arctic and Eastern Canada Paperback – January 1, by A.W. Mansfield (Author) See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price Author: A.W. Mansfield. Get this from a library. Seals of Arctic and eastern Canada. [A W Mansfield; Fisheries Research Board of Canada,]. see more details, seals seals Subject Category: Organism Names see more details.

Descriptor(s): aquatic animals aquatic animals Subject Category: Organism Groups see more details, aquatic organisms aquatic organisms Subject Category: Organism Groups see more details, feeding feeding Subject Category: Techniques, Methodologies and EquipmentCited by: This is a list of the mammal species recorded in are approximately mammal species native to large territorial size and variety of ecosystems, ranging from oceanic coasts, to mountains to plains to urban housing, mean that Canada can harbour a great variety of species, including nearly half of the known most well represented order is that of the rodents.

Arctic seals range in size depending on their species. The smallest of them all are ringed seals which are 4 to 4 1/2 feet long, on average, and weigh between and pounds. By contrast, hooded seals are the largest found in the Arctic region, measuring between roughly 8 and 10 feet long and weighing in at up to pounds.

Archaeological evidence indicates that seals have been used by the indigenous peoples of eastern Canada for at least years.

A number of species are still hunted, including ringed seals (Phoca hispida), bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) and walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) in coastal regions of the Canadian Arctic. Harp seals are a conservation icon that we often see in the media.

Images of fuzzy white harp seal pups are often used in campaigns to save seals (from hunting) and the ocean in general. These are cold-weather seals who live in the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans.

Although they are white when born, adults have a distinctive silvery gray with a. Harps seals come from afar to molt, pup and breed Each year, for approximately 3 weeks in late February and early March, over a hundred thousand harp seals make their way from as far as Greenland, Baffin Island and other parts of the arctic and subarctic to congregate on the ice near the Îles-de-la-Madeleine to molt, pup and breed before migrating back north to summer feeding grounds.

The Arctic Circle runs across the top of the continent, most of the archipelago lies above it. The Arctic North of Canada is a huge place and those islands add up to a vast area, three of these islands, Baffin, Victoria and Ellesmere are respectively the 5th, 8th and 10th largest islands in the world.

The harbor (or harbour) seal (Phoca vitulina), also known as the common seal, is a true seal found along temperate and Arctic marine coastlines of the Northern most widely distributed species of pinniped (walruses, eared seals, and true seals), they are found in coastal waters of the northern Atlantic, Pacific Oceans, Baltic and North Seas.

5. Ringed seal. The ringed seal lives in both the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, and it sighted in the Hudson Bay and the Baltic and Bering Seas. It is the smallest of the Arctic seals, and it has a small head, a plump body, and a short cat-like snout.

The animal's coat appears dark with silver rings on the sides and back, and a silver belly. Blubber is a thick layer of fat, also called adipose tissue, directly under the skin of all marine mammals. Blubber covers the entire body of animals such as seals, whales, and walruses—except for their fins, flippers, and flukes.

Arctic Science is a quarterly open-access peer-reviewed journal. An interdisciplinary journal, Arctic Science, publishes original peer-reviewed research from all areas of natural science and applied science & engineering related to northern Polar Regions.»More about the journal, scope, and Editorial Board.

Arctic Seals. There are six species of seal found in the Arctic. They are: the bearded seal, harp seal, hooded seal, ribbon seal, ringed seal and spotted seal. The walrus is the only other pinniped found in the Arctic. The eared seals found furthest north are the northern fur seal.

In the western North Atlantic, harbor seals are distributed from the eastern Canadian Arctic and Greenland south to southern New England and New York, and occasionally to the Carolinas. Current evidence suggests that population or management units are on the scale of a.

The total population of gray seals in eastern Canada increased from approximat animals in toanimals in QUOTAS. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans of Canada sets quotas at levels that ensure the health and abundance of seal herds, and considers many factors, such as: Ice conditions.

The Harp Seal Pagophilus groenlandicus is a gregarious, migratory seal inhabiting Arctic and sub-Arctic waters of the North Atlantic Ocean. In spring, asthe ice recedes, the largest of three known breeding populations migrates up the east coas of Canada from the Gulf of St Lawrence, along the coast of Labrador, to the Canadian Archipelago, Hudson Bay, and the west coast of Greenland.

Harpoon-head. Yupiit; Kuskokwim. Ivory, brass, and seal or walrus skin, pre One piece of adaptive technology used to hunt seals, as well as whales and walrus, is still used today. As year-round inhabitants of the Arctic, seals provide crucial nutrients and materials for Inuit.

Get this from a library. The grey seal in eastern Canada. [A W Mansfield; B Beck; Canada. Fisheries and Marine Service.; Arctic Biological Station.] -- General biology of Halichoerus grypus based on censuses, marking and collections made in all localities in Maritime Provinces and Quebec where they are known to occur regularly,   Seals play a large role in the lives of Greenland residents, and around are harvested annually.

The meat is eaten by much of the population, and sealskins are the main source of income for most of the ca. full-time hunters. Six species of Arctic and Subarctic seals are included.

This is the only book to focus on the geomorphological landscapes of eastern Canada and provides a companion volume to “Landscapes and Landforms of Western Canada” (). There are a number of unique characteristics of eastern Canada’s landscapes, notably its magnificent coastlines, the extraordinary variety and extent of wetlands, the.

Protests focus on these species in part because harp seals account for the vast majority of the commercial seal harvest in Canada, and the pelts of young seals hold more market value. Despite this opposition, seal hunts are carefully managed in Canada, and the harvesting of seal pups has been illegal since   1.

Introduction. Seal meat and organs are important country foods of Inuit in Arctic and subarctic Canada and Greenland. In addition to subsistence harvests, some seal species are also harvested commercially in a government regulated sustainable harvest in eastern Canada (Hammill and Stenson, ; DFO, ), and seal meat is available at retail in this region.